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The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity
Libros en idiomas extranjeros > Ciencias, tecnología y medicina > Medicina > Cuestiones generales
Descripción del producto
Fine cloth copy in a near-fine, very slightly edge-nicked and dust-dulled dw, now mylar-sleeved. Remains particularly and surprisingly well-preserved overall; tight, bright, clean and strong.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 831 pages; Physical description: xvi, 831p. Plates ; 24cm. Subjects: Medicine - History. Summary: Medicine advances ever faster, and with it not just a capacity to overcome sickness, but to transform the very nature of life. Starting in ancient antiquity, this text charts how this health revolution came about and how life for human beings in the West has ceased, in Hobbes' memorable phrase, to be "nasty, brutish and short." Porter plots the growth of medical specialisms - pharmacology, physiology, anatomy, neurology, bacteriology - and the institutions of medicine - the hospital and asylum - to show how medical advances have often created as many problems as they have solved.
Detalles del producto
Idioma(s): Inglés Publicado, Inglés Idioma original, Inglés Desconocido
Productor: HarperCollins
Editor: HarperCollins
Código EAN: 9780002151733
Código UPC: Incógnita
Autor(es): Roy Porter
Versión: First Edition

Fine cloth copy in a near-fine, very slightly edge-nicked and dust-dulled dw, now mylar-sleeved. Remains particularly and surprisingly well-preserved overall; tight, bright, clean and strong.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 831 pages; Physical description: xvi, 831p. Plates ; 24cm. Subjects: Medicine - History. Summary: Medicine advances ever faster, and with it not just a capacity to overcome sickness, but to transform the very nature of life. Starting in ancient antiquity, this text charts how this health revolution came about and how life for human beings in the West has ceased, in Hobbes' memorable phrase, to be "nasty, brutish and short." Porter plots the growth of medical specialisms - pharmacology, physiology, anatomy, neurology, bacteriology - and the institutions of medicine - the hospital and asylum - to show how medical advances have often created as many problems as they have solved.
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